About Me

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North Lawrence, New York, United States
I can be described as lover of life, an animal lover, and lover of education. I am constantly striving for knowledge and learning opportunities. I've been around horses my entire life. I enjoy working with horses and their human partners through natural horsemanship philosophies, natural balance bare foot hoof care, reiki, red-light therapy, essential oils, aromatherapy, crystal healing, chromotherapy, flower essences, and more. I am a Usui Shiki Ryoho Reiki Master Teacher who offers treatments for people, horses, dogs, cats, and other creatures great and small. I also teach Reiki classes for those interested in learning how to treat themselves, their loved ones, and even their animals! Natural Horse Lover Farm is located in Northern New York between the St. Lawrence River and Adirondack Mountains. Heaven on Earth. naturalhorseloverfarm.com

Sunday, August 03, 2014

A great day judging!

I was asked six days ago,to fill in and judge this year's mini horse show. I was more than happy to step in and glad I did. The exhibitors and their horses worked very hard and did great. I judged the same show last year (run by another club) and had many of the same people (kids and adults) there as today. I LOVE judging open/fun shows because they are a great opportunity for everyone to learn, grow, compete, and have a good time. I look forward to potential events with these folks (and anyone else interested) at my place through clinics, lessons, and play days. 

Here is an article from the Watertown Daily Times. 

Mini-horse show returns for second year to Gouverneur & St. Lawrence County Fair

By MARTHA ELLEN
TIMES STAFF WRITER
PUBLISHED: SUNDAY, AUGUST 3, 2014 AT 7:49 PM

MELANIE KIMBLER-LAGO • WATERTOWN DAILY TIMES
Meadow M. Greenhill, 8, grimaces as her horse, Kneehigh, drops for a backrub Sunday during the miniature horse show at the Gouverneur & St. Lawrence County Fair in Gouverneur.

MELANIE KIMBLER-LAGO • WATERTOWN DAILY TIMES
Meadow M. Greenhill, 8, grimaces as her horse, Kneehigh, drops for a backrub Sunday during the miniature horse show at the Gouverneur & St. Lawrence County Fair in Gouverneur.

MELANIE KIMBLER-LAGO • WATERTOWN DAILY TIMES
Alexys L. Denesha, 8, shows her horse, Fame, during the miniature horse show at the Gouverneur & St. Lawrence County Fair in Gouverneur.

MELANIE KIMBLER-LAGO • WATERTOWN DAILY TIMES
Tia, the smallest horse at the miniature horse show, munches on hay Sunday at the Gouverneur & St. Lawrence County Fair in Gouverneur.

GOUVERNEUR — Miniature horses are so adorable it is easy to keep getting more.
Vicki L. Wilson’s husband, Leo J., bought one for her eight years ago as an anniversary present. They now have 22 miniatures and one regular size horse. “They’re so small and cute,” Mrs. Wilson said while waiting for an adult class to start at the miniature horse show Sunday at the Gouverneur & St. Lawrence County Fair. “I can handle these without any trouble.”

Miniature horses, which by regulation cannot be taller than 38 inches, are great for children, Mrs. Wilson said.

“They’re easy for kids,” she said. “Once you get your confidence, you might be ready to move up to a bigger horse.”Or they might just stay with the miniatures.

The popularity of miniature horses is on the rise, said Pete S. Denesha, announcer at the show and leader of a 4-H Club in Gouverneur whose focus is on miniatures.
“Right now, we have 10 members and we’re growing,” he said. “Another year, we’ll have a real good show of them.”

The show at the Gouverneur fair included 20 classes. The Franklin County Fair will have its miniature horse show Saturday with 60 classes.
“They’ve been into it a lot longer,” he said.

Anyone interested in miniature horses or the 4-H club can call Mr. Denesha, 535-4300, or his sister, Kay McIntosh, 287-2246, who supplied many of the miniature horses shown at the fair.

Wendy S. Noonan, Gouverneur, said her daughter, Riley J., is a rider, but has enjoyed working with Phantom, one of Ms. McIntosh’s miniatures, so much that she hopes to bring the horse with them when they move back to Nashville. “She’s just had a ball,” Mrs. Noonan said.

Miniature horses are created by breeding down smaller ponies for the desired size.
While the miniatures are small, they have the temperament of a horse and can be stubborn, kick or bite.

The show is a chance for youngsters to learn about respect for their animals, judge Michelle L. Young, Natural Horse Lover Farm, North Lawrence, said.

“It’s not just about ribbons,” she said. “I’m looking to see whether they have the connection. If you give respect and space, a horse will perform better for you. They need to trust their horse.”
Horses are claustrophobic, she said.

“One of the big tips is to get off a horse’s head. It’s counter-intuitive to what most people are taught,” she said. “My goal is holistic and alternative horsemanship.”

Jo Cutrie, Gouverneur, whose daughter, Taylor L. Vickers, was showing Pixie, one of Ms. McIntosh’s horses, agreed that teamwork is key. “It’s a bonding,” she said. “She and Pixie hit it off almost immediately.”

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